The "Canadian" Problem: A Letter to Canadians in lieu of Orange Shirt Day

Today I had posted a photo to my Instagram account talking about my connection to the Indian Residential School and day school systems in Canada. As I published the photo and caption I began to think of ideas and thoughts I may have failed to include. One of them in particular, was the fact that these experiences are ongoing issues and continue to be connected to the contemporary political, social and economic climate that is Canada. While it is true that it is my (our) responsibility as an Indigenous person(s) to find ways to cope and heal from the remnants of pain that have been passed down to me (us), this does not mean that settler-Canadians are let off the hook.

Read More

My First Week On the Ketogenic Diet: My Results and Reflections

One of my biggest motivators to eat keto was that I believed it could give me opportunity, and encourage me, to decolonize my diet and eat more natural foods indigenous to the land of my people. As Anishinaabe Ojibwe peoples our traditional diets consist mainly of wild game such as moose, deer, rabbit, muskrat, beaver, duck, prairie chickens, partridges, geese etc., berries such as blueberries, strawberries and raspberries, maple syrup and wild nuts. From what I understand, carb-heavy foods such as flour and bread (that includes bannock and fry-bread) etc., have been introduced recently to our nations. We think 500 years of colonization is a long time but it is merely a blip of our existence of being on Turtle Island as Indigenous peoples. Thus, I do not think it is far-fetched to assume that the introduction of these carb-heavy foods has contributed to the food-related diseases that many of our people are battling with today. The processes of colonization, whether that be through the altering of our lands through corporations such as Manitoba Hydro or through the introduction of processed foods in our grocery stores and rez stores, has influenced our diets negatively. Although many people still hunt, trap and pick berries, the majority of our people have limited access to fresh, whole foods and depend primarily on getting foods from the grocery store or rez store. 

Read More

Bezhig - My First Post

Madwewechige is a word in Anishinaabemowin that translates to 'making sound' or to 'make sound'. When reflecting on this word and the meaning it carries, I think about how there are many different interpretations of what 'making sound' looks, feels, or literally 'sounds' like. From what I understand and from within my own context, I interpret making sound as singing or making music. I also see making sound as sounding my voice - whether that be through speaking truthfully, speaking with kindness, or challenging and disrupting 'the status quo'.

Read More